Tag Archives: Jesus

Gospel Reflection for December 21, 2014, 4th Sunday of Advent

16 Dec

Sunday Readings: 2 Samuel 7.1-5, 8-12, 14-16; Romans 16.25-27; Luke 1.26-38

“The angel Gabriel was sent by God to a city in Galilee named Nazareth, to a virgin engaged to a man named Joseph of the house of David. The girl’s name was Mary.”

Luke 1.26-27

In Mary, the Most High will overshadow and dwell in a human person, intensifying God’s presence among us. No longer will God only tent among Israel’s tents and dwell in a house among Israel’s homes, but God will become human incarnate, one of us and one with us. How can this be? This same God who created all that is will make the impossible come to be in Mary.

The becoming human will happen in Mary’s womb. She will feel the first stirrings of salvation within her own body. God’s Son will look like her. She will nurse and rock him after he is born.

How is Mary’s call like the call of every Christian?

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Gospel Reflection for December 14, 2014, 3rd Sunday of Advent

8 Dec

Sunday Readings: Isaiah 61.1-2,10-11; 1 Thessalonians 5.16-24; John 1.6-8, 19-28

“Among you stands one whom you do not know.”

John 1.26

John the Baptist refuses to apply people’s expectations of the messiah to himself.  He anticipates one greater than he is coming.  He testifies to the light.  He insists that “Among you stands one whom you do not know.”  The words come down the centuries to haunt and taunt us into recognizing where we see Jesus among us.

Ours is the task of recognizing God at work in the hardest of all places to see–in ourselves, in our passion for justice, in the events of our history, in our own unrelenting efforts to hold our families and communities together.  We live in an unfinished drama and unfolding mystery that is the Spirit of God’s life-giving presence with us.

To what light do you testify in your unrelenting struggles?

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Gospel Reflection for November 30, 2014, 1st Sunday of Advent

26 Nov

Sunday Readings: Isaiah 63.16-17,19; 64.2-7; Corinthians 1.3-9; Mark 13.33-37
 
“Stay awake, for you do not know when the owner of the house will come–in the evening, or at midnight, at cockcrow or dawn.”  

Mark 13.35

Jesus’ tiny parable calls us to stay awake throughout the Church year.  There are doorways all the time where we encounter one another and have opportunities to be present.  Our houses and offices have doors.  These are thresholds where we meet and can be awake to one another.

In dark midnight moments our fears can take us over.  The urge is strong to avoid the hard.  Who has not heard the cock crow and recognized I profoundly regret something I never thought I was even capable of doing?  At the heart of our faith is the dawn moments, the hour of resurrection.  In our faith that God raised up Jesus to new life is a spirituality that believes new life can come where relationships are dead or where leaders are asleep to people’s needs.

At what doorways are you watching for God’s coming?

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‘Tis the Season

21 Nov
via Flickr user Ed Schipul

via Flickr user Ed Schipul

We are still two weeks from the beginning of Advent, but the holiday decorations are up at Target. The diamond jewelry and red-bow tied car commercials have started. Walmart is gearing up.

The day after we give thanks for what we have, Black Friday focuses on what we don’t.

We are left to figure out how to infuse our holiday season with a sense of the sacred. How do we decide which rituals are life-giving and which are life-draining? How do we shift from fear and scarcity back to trust and abundance? How do we move from feeling not-enough to enough? How do we prioritize relationship over consumption? How do we let go of anxiety and embrace laughter? How do we choose presence over presents? What tangible steps can we take this year to put Christ back at the center of Christmas?

Jesus teaches us to pray, “Give us this day our daily bread.” He boldly asks us to trust, to live one day at a time and know that we have enough today.

Jesus comes to us as a baby to show us a different way of being. It is an invitation that is upon us today. May the utter dependence, pure innocence, daring beauty, urgent cry, calming coo, and gentle touch God, come to us as a newborn, direct our hearts and minds this season.

Gospel Reflection for November 23, 2014, Feast of Christ the King

19 Nov

Sunday scripture readings: Ezekiel 34.11-12,15-17; 1 Corinthians 15.20-26,28; Matthew 25.31-46

“Lord, when was it that we saw you hungry and gave you food, or thirsty and gave you something to drink?  And when was it that we saw you a stranger and welcomed you or naked and gave you clothing?  And when was it that we saw you sick or in prison and visited you?  And the king will answer them, “Truly I tell you, just as you did it to one of the least of my brothers and sisters, you did it to me.”

Matthew 25.37-40

Matthew’s gospel places the judgment of the nations immediately before Jesus’ passion in the flow of the gospel narrative.  In his passion Jesus himself becomes the least among us, suffering the kind of execution aimed to shame and subdue rebellious slaves.  Sunday’s parable invites us to recognize Jesus is all those who suffer.

In whom that you know do you see Jesus suffering?

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Gospel Reflection for November 9, 2014, Dedication of Lateran Basilica

3 Nov

“For 46 years this Temple has been being built, and you are going to raise it up in three days?”

John 2.20

In Sunday’s gospel Jesus cleanses the Temple.  The passage focuses on his prophetic actions, chasing out the animals for sacrifice, dumping the coins for paying Temple taxes, and overturning the money changers’ tables.  Jesus’ prophetic actions take place at Passover, the best time for business at the Temple.  What Jesus does is like throwing out the merchandise at Macy’s the last week before Christmas.

What prophetic action might Jesus do in our Church today?

Scripture Readings: Ezekiel 47, 1-2, 8-9, 12; 1 Corinthians 3.9c-11, 16-17; John 2.13-22

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On Miracles

18 Sep
via flickr user Fr Lawrence Lew, O.P.

via flickr user Fr Lawrence Lew, O.P.

Now when Jesus heard this, he withdrew from there in a boat to a deserted place by himself. But when the crowds heard it, they followed him on foot from the towns.  When he went ashore, he saw a great crowd; and he had compassion for them and cured their sick. When it was evening, the disciples came to him and said, “This is a deserted place, and the hour is now late; send the crowds away so that they may go into the villages and buy food for themselves.” Jesus said to them, “They need not go away; you give them something to eat.” They replied, “We have nothing here but five loaves and two fish.” And he said, “Bring them here to me.” Then he ordered the crowds to sit down on the grass. Taking the five loaves and the two fish, he looked up to heaven, and blessed and broke the loaves, and gave them to the disciples, and the disciples gave them to the crowds. And all ate and were filled; and they took up what was left over of the broken pieces, twelve baskets full. And those who ate were about five thousand men, besides women and children. –Matthew 14:13-21

In my experience teaching the Gospel stories, there are three main knee-jerk reactions to Jesus’ miracles:

1) Some disregard the stories immediately using human logic and let the slippery slope of faith take over. “There’s no way Jesus could have turned five loaves and two fish into an abundant meal for five thousand people. It just didn’t happen. So what in the Bible can we trust? I bet none of it is true.”

2) Some believe the stories immediately using faith and let apply that faith to the whole Bible. “Jesus is God, fully divine, and these awesome miracle stories get at that. What is in the Bible happened as it is written and is true. God is requiring us to live in wonder and trust through faith.”

3) And others try explain the miracle in a way that uses logic but doesn’t require dismissing the story completely. “It was radical of Jesus to ask the crowd to sit and rest and be served. Originally, the crowd was individually selfish, but the miracle here is that Jesus got them to share. When everyone gave what they had, there was more than enough.”

Where do you fall when you read the miracle stories? Do you believe in miracles? How does that affect your faith lens in your daily life? How do you react when someone who believes the opposite expresses that?

What if we tried, just for a moment, to not jump into the reactionary space we are used to when reading the miracle stories? What if we suspended our instincts and sat down in the middle of the miracle stories and looked around? It’s hard to do. These stories get straight at something that divides us. We don’t want to be considered silly or faithless. Instead of jumping to a conclusion about happening truth, though, let’s ask, “What do we have to learn about the nature of God and Jesus from these miracle stories?”

One thing that strikes me about the miracle narratives is how Jesus uses very ordinary material to do extraordinary things. He turns water into wine. He stills the storm. He uses his own spit to heal the blind man. In the story above, bread and fish are the material used. Nothing could be more ordinary. It seems to me, then, that things like food and water and our imperfect bodies matter to Jesus. He pays attention to them. They are essential ingredients in his ministry. Through the remarkable, we learn that God has dominion over the mundane, the ordinary, the elemental. God has our very ordinary daily lives in God’s sight. It begs me to stay awake and pay attention to what comes out of my tap, what I’m chewing on and this body that I was given. There is truth in these stories, enmeshed in the ordinary and extraordinary, for us to ruminate on about God’s activity in our world. There are more subtle and profound truths there for me to find, and they can be missed if we hurry to explain and make sense instead of sitting in the muck of the middle and letting God whisper to us.

Gospel Reflection for May 25, 2014, Sixth Sunday of Easter

20 May
Jesus told his disciples, “And I will ask the Father, who will give you another Advocate to abide with you always: the Spirit of truth, whom the world cannot accept, since it neither sees nor recognizes the Spirit; but you know the Spirit because the Spirit abides with you and will be in you.” 

John 14.16-17


Jesus assures the disciples that they will have everything they need for their lives and mission after he is gone. Furthermore, if they stay open to the guidance of the Holy Spirit, they will continue to experience divine presence.

How would you feel in the disciples’ place?

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Gospel Reflection for May 18, 2014, Fifth Sunday of Easter

16 May

Philip said, “Lord, show us the Father and that will be enough for us.”
Jesus answered, “All this time I have been with you, Philip, and you do not know me? Whoever sees me has seen the Father. How can you say, ‘Show us the Father?’”

John 14.8-9


In responding to Philip, Jesus shifts the conversation from seeing to believing, from insisting “whoever sees me sees the Father” to asking Philip, “Do you not believe that I am in the Father and the Father is in me?” In this passage Jesus speaks not only to disciples who like Philip once saw and knew him face to face, heard his words and observed his deeds, but also to all of us who believe on the strength of the written testimony in the gospel.

What do you see in Jesus that helps form your image of God?

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Gospel Reflection for May 11, 2014, Fourth Sunday of Easter

5 May
Jesus said, “The one who enters through the gate is shepherd of the sheep; the keeper opens the gate for him.  The sheep hear his voice as he calls his own by name and leads them out.”

John 10.30-31


The shepherd allegory offers the intimacy between shepherd and sheep as an image of the relationship between Jesus and believers.  The sheep know the shepherd’s voice.  The shepherd and sheep walk and pasture together, live together, make life possible for each other.

How do you shepherd others in your life?

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