Tag Archives: Sister Joan

Gospel Reflection for August 3, 2014, 18th Sunday of Ordinary Time

31 Jul
The kingdom of heaven is like a treasure hidden in a field, which a man found and hid; then in his joy he goes and sells all that he has and buys that field.

Matthew 13.44


As a teaching method, Jesus repeatedly explores the kingdom of heaven by comparing it to real life stories and concrete images.  A parable links the daily and familiar with the mystery of God that is beyond all knowing.  This means our experience cracks open the door to they mystery of God.  It means we encounter God is our daily life.

To make Jesus known, to evangelize, Pope Francis challenges us to create a new language of parables in his exhortation Joy of the Gospel, “Be bold enough to discover new signs and new symbols, new flesh to embody and communicate the word and different forms of beauty that are valued in different cultural settings (#167).

To what in your experience might you compare the kingdom of heaven?

 

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Gospel Reflection for July 27, 2014, 17th Sunday of Ordinary Time

23 Jul
The kingdom of heaven is like a net thrown into the sea, which collects fish of every kind.  When it is full, they haul it ashore and sit down to put what is good in buckets.  What is bad they throw away.

Matthew 13.47-48


Matthew never knows when to quit.  Rather than end his chapter full of parables with the promise of a hundredfold yield or with the farmer and merchant who find their treasure, Matthew includes in chapter 13 the story of a net full of fish that need sorting.  Perhaps the Christians for whom he wrote are sorting themselves out.  Some choose to open their hearts as good ground to receive Jesus’ word.  Perhaps some cannot see in Jesus a treasure worth their lives and wholehearted commitment.

Jesus’ parables don’t boss us.  Instead parables challenge us to work on what they reveal about ourselves.  They call us to throw out the useless in our lives and embrace all that gives life.

What treasure do you seek?  What does it reveal about you?

 

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Take a Step Toward Jesus

2 Jul Joan Mitchell, CSJ
via flickr user Catholic Church (England and Wales)

via flickr user Catholic Church (England and Wales)

 

by Joan Mitchell, CSJ

In Joy of the Gospel Pope Francis writes as a person who practices the Ignatian spirituality of the Jesuit society to which he belongs.  St. Ignatius teaches that an examen of consciousness is a daily prayer too basic to skip.  His method involves taking time each day to identify people and events that excite and energize us, and conversely, encounters that haunt us with regrets or fears.  An examen concludes with asking God’s help and expressing gratitude for God’s gifts.  Over time this simple practice helps the gospel transform how we live our everyday lives and makes us evangelizers who attract others.

In his recent exhortation Pope Francis calls us “to proclaim the gospel without excluding anyone, without imposing new obligations; rather to share our joy, point to a horizon of beauty and invite others to a delicious banquet” (14).  He testifies to his experience of joy in Jesus in the first 24 paragraphs of his exhortation.  Take a step toward Jesus; he’s already there (3).

The pope’s call sounds like the experience of our first Sisters of St. Joseph, who describe themselves as “seized by God’s love.”  They were responding to the preaching of our Jesuit founder Father Pierre Medaille, awakening to the difference they could make among the multitudes of people who are poor in France in 1650.

“We become fully human when we become more than human,” Francis says, “when we let God bring us beyond ourselves in order to attain the fullest truth of our being” (8).

The first time I read Joy of the Gospel, I could hardly believe Pope Francis cites so many verses I have prayed and lived.  For example, for those suffering, he suggests two of my favorites from the Old Testament book of Lamentations.  This book vividly describes the ruined city of Jerusalem, then ends with the verses that helped me survive my mother’s death:

The steadfast love of God never ceases;
God’s mercies never come to an end;
they are new each morning.
So great is God’s faithfulness” (Lamentation 3.22-23).

Our new pope comes from a new social location, not Europe, not a first world country.  He shows not only a Latin American sensibility for beauty and joy but a voice sharply critical of global capitalism that leaves vast numbers of people poor.  He describes his critique of an economy of exclusion as “an evangelical discernment.”

Pope Francis thinks the 5th commandment, “Thou shall not kill,” forbids an economy of exclusion and inequality.  “How can it be that it is not a news item when an elderly homeless person dies of exposure, but it is news when the stock market loses two points?  This is the case of exclusion.  Can we continue to stand by when food is thrown away while people are starving?  This is a case of inequality” (53).

His questions give us in the United States lots to think about.  So does his description of a new economic tyranny.  “While the earnings of a minority are growing exponentially, so too is the gap separating the majority from the prosperity enjoyed by those happy few.  This imbalance is the result of ideologies which defend the absolute autonomy of the marketplace and financial speculation.  Consequently, they reject the right of states, charged with vigilance for the common good, to exercise any form of control.  A new tyranny is thus born…” (56).

Here are some questions for discussion:

  1. How does Francis view trickle-down economics and ideologies that depend on the absolute autonomy of the marketplace?  How does he view the relationship of inequality and exclusion to peace?  How can American Catholics respond?  #53-58
  2. Among the things eroding culture according to Francis in paragraphs #61-75, which seem threats to you?
  3. What would you say to Pope Francis in response to his comments on the importance of lay people and women in paragraphs #102-104?
  4. What call do you hear personally to become a more transforming evangelizer?

Gospel Reflection for June 8, 2014, Pentecost

3 Jun
 Jesus said to his disciples, “Peace be with you.  As the Father has sent me, so I send you.”

John 20.21


In this Easter appearance Jesus gives his friends a purpose that makes the passage a fitting Pentecost gospel. Jesus sends disciples as the Father sent him. He commissions them and us to continue his mission. For this purpose Jesus breathes his animating Spirit upon them just as the Creator breathed life into the first humans in Genesis 2.24.

What nudgings of the Spirit do you perceive recurring in you?  How do you respond?

 

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Gospel Reflection for May 4, 2014, Third Sunday of Easter

29 Apr

Two disciples were walking from Jerusalem to Emmaus and began talking to a stranger about Jesus’ death and all that had transpired since that time.  They did not recognize that the stranger was the risen Jesus.

While Jesus sat with the two disciples, he took bread, blessed it, broke it, and gave it to them.  Their eyes were opened, and they recognized, him but he vanished from their sight.

Luke 24.30-31


The mystery of God’s ways escapes the two disciples, even though Jesus had told his disciples three times that in Jerusalem he would suffer, die, and be raised up.  The disciples’ expect that their journey with Jesus will end in earthly triumph, which blinds them to the presence of God in the unprecedented and bewildering events unfolding around them.  They handle their confusion by retreating to a comfortable place they once came from.

When have your expectations blinded you to the presence of God at work in your life?

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Gospel Reflection for April 20, 2014, Easter Sunday

14 Apr

Mary Magdalene had gone to the tomb and found that Jesus was missing. She could not find him and was crying.

Jesus asked, “Woman, why are you weeping? Who are you looking for?Mary supposed the man to be the gardener and responded, “Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have laid him, and I will take him away.”

Jesus said, “Mary.”

Mary turned to Jesus and answered, “Rabbouni!”

 John 20.15-16
via flickr user Elvert Barnes

via flickr user Elvert Barnes


Mary Magdalene is the first of all of Jesus’ followers to have a personal experience of the risen Jesus. When Jesus speaks Mary’s name, she recognizes the gardener is her beloved teacher. Like the sheep who knows the shepherd’s voice, Mary hears her name and recognizes Jesus. She hears, turns, and believes.

When has Jesus called you by name?

Gospel Reflection for April 13, 2014, Palm/Passion Sunday

7 Apr

About three o’clock Jesus cried out in a loud tone, “Eli, Eli, lema sabachthani?”  This means, “My God, my God.  Why have you forsaken me?”

Matthew 27.46


The events of the passion test and manifest Jesus’ love for God, for the world, for his friends, and for the community that still gathers in his name.  Jesus endures not only the pain and shame of crucifixion but one friend’s betrayal, another’s denial, and God’s seeming abandonment.

When have you found Jesus with you in times of betrayal or suffering or seeming abandonment?

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Gospel Reflection for March 16, 2014, 2nd Sunday of Lent

10 Mar
via flickr user Horia Varlan

via flickr user Horia Varlan

Jesus was transfigured in front of his disciples.
Out of the cloud came a voice, “This is my beloved Son, on whom my favor rests.  Listen to him.”

Matthew 17.5

 His transfiguration takes place just after Jesus tells his disciples for the first time he will suffer, die, and rise on the third day.  This awakening to Jesus’ suffering moves the disciples from ordinary to sacred time.

In his transfiguration the disciples see Jesus as both divine and vulnerable, belonging to both heaven and earth, residing in both ordinary and extraordinary worlds.  His transfiguration terrifies his followers, but Jesus touches them gently and tells them not to fear.

This vision disturbs their lives.  The solid ground on which they stand shifts.  They move from ordinary space to sacred space, from mundane to mystery.

When has an awakening transformed your past and future?

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Gospel Reflection for March 9, 1st Sunday of Lent

4 Mar

Jesus said, “Scripture says, ‘Not by bread alone do people live but by every word that comes from the mouth of God.’”

Matthew 4.4

Jesus lives by God’s word not by bread alone.  He refuses to put God to the test.  He worships God alone, the first commandment.  His testimony calls us to welcome and chew on God’s word this Lent and resist popular images of success.

What images of success have you tested and found false in your life?

Gospel Reflection for March 2nd, 8th Sunday in Ordinary Time

25 Feb

Jesus said, “No one can serve two masters.  People who try either hate one and love the other or pay attention to one and despise the other.  You cannot give yourself to God and money.”

 Matthew 6:24

Sunday’s gospel begins with a generic saying: No one can serve two masters.  What makes the saying memorable is its one-two punch—one can’t serve two.  Also the statement is absolute—no one can serve two.  The no sets our mind scrambling for an exception, testing its truth.  In the end, the gospel names its own specific conflict.  You can’t give yourself to God and money.

What conflicts do you experience between God and money?

 

via flickr user jeffweese

via flickr user jeffweese

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