Tag Archives: Sunday By Sunday

Gospel Reflection for November 30, 2014, 1st Sunday of Advent

26 Nov

Sunday Readings: Isaiah 63.16-17,19; 64.2-7; Corinthians 1.3-9; Mark 13.33-37
 
“Stay awake, for you do not know when the owner of the house will come–in the evening, or at midnight, at cockcrow or dawn.”  

Mark 13.35

Jesus’ tiny parable calls us to stay awake throughout the Church year.  There are doorways all the time where we encounter one another and have opportunities to be present.  Our houses and offices have doors.  These are thresholds where we meet and can be awake to one another.

In dark midnight moments our fears can take us over.  The urge is strong to avoid the hard.  Who has not heard the cock crow and recognized I profoundly regret something I never thought I was even capable of doing?  At the heart of our faith is the dawn moments, the hour of resurrection.  In our faith that God raised up Jesus to new life is a spirituality that believes new life can come where relationships are dead or where leaders are asleep to people’s needs.

At what doorways are you watching for God’s coming?

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Gospel Reflection for November 23, 2014, Feast of Christ the King

19 Nov

Sunday scripture readings: Ezekiel 34.11-12,15-17; 1 Corinthians 15.20-26,28; Matthew 25.31-46

“Lord, when was it that we saw you hungry and gave you food, or thirsty and gave you something to drink?  And when was it that we saw you a stranger and welcomed you or naked and gave you clothing?  And when was it that we saw you sick or in prison and visited you?  And the king will answer them, “Truly I tell you, just as you did it to one of the least of my brothers and sisters, you did it to me.”

Matthew 25.37-40

Matthew’s gospel places the judgment of the nations immediately before Jesus’ passion in the flow of the gospel narrative.  In his passion Jesus himself becomes the least among us, suffering the kind of execution aimed to shame and subdue rebellious slaves.  Sunday’s parable invites us to recognize Jesus is all those who suffer.

In whom that you know do you see Jesus suffering?

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12 Nov

UN-Infographic

“We can no longer trust in the unseen forces and the invisible hand of the market. Growth in justice requires more than economic growth, while presupposing such growth: it requires decisions, programs, mechanisms, and processes specifically geared to a better distribution of income, the creation of sources of employment, and an integral promotion of the poor which goes beyond a simple welfare mentality.”

Joy of the Gospel #204

In 2000 at the United Nations, 192 nations committed to 8 Millennium Development Goals to achieve by 2015. It took only 10 years to achieve the first goal — to cut in half the number of people living on $1.25 a day. Today 90% of the children in our world complete primary school, both girls and boys (goal 2). More than 2.3 billion people had safe drinking water by 2012.

In fact, the success of the MDGs shows more is possible. The United Nations is working on Sustainable Development Goals to focus and further the work of a sustainable future for all.

“Each individual Christian and every community is called to be an instrument of God for the liberation and promotion of the poor, enabling them to be fully a part of society” (Joy of the Gospel #187).

What is a way you work to include people in poverty in our economy?

Gospel Reflection for November 16, 2014, 33rd Sunday of Ordinary Time

11 Nov

“Then the one who had received the one talent came forward and said, ‘Master, I knew you were a demanding person, harvesting where you did not plant and gathering where you did not scatter, so out of fear I went off and buried your talent in the ground. Here it is back.'”

Matthew 25.24-25

One talent is equivalent to 6,000 denarii. One denarius is the standard day’s wage for a worker in Jesus’ time. Anyone who works six days a week for one denarius a day earns 340 denarii a year. An ordinary laborer would work 17 years to earn one talent. The master in Sunday’s gospel entrusts his servants with incredible wealth.

Each human person receives the priceless windfall of life itself. We each have life without having caused ourselves to be. Our ancestors have invested themselves in relationships and efforts that bring us to full adulthood. Jesus invested his life in the human race, identifying with us totally unto death, opening to us all we can become in God. How do we use these extravagant down payments on ourselves?

What is one of the most valuable ways you have invested your life energies in our world and its people?

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Gospel Reflection for October 12, 2014, 28th Sunday Ordinary Time

8 Oct

“I have prepared my banquet…everything is ready. Come to the feast.”

Matthew 22.4

Christians today don’t catch on readily to Matthew’s allegory. For first-century Jews, both Christian Jews and rabbinic Jews, the Jewish-Roman war that destroyed the temple was a watershed event. Until then, rabbinic Jews who studied the Torah in synagogues and Christian Jews who broke bread in Jesus’ name in house churches came together for temple feasts. With the temple gone, differences between the two groups sharpened. The community for whom Matthew writes lives in the midst of this conflict.

Over the centuries Christians have wrongly seen in Matthew’s allegory reason to persecute Jewish people. Matthew connects the parable to events in his time. The parable will say more to us today without these details. The parable is first and foremost the story of a man who prepares a great feast and wants others to share it.

What do you do with abundant leftovers?

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Gospel Reflection for October 5, 2014, 27th Sunday Ordinary Time

6 Oct

“The kingdom of God…will be given to people that produce its fruits.”

Matthew 21.43

We humans are like all tenants of Earth and like those in Sunday’s parable.  Our basest instincts are to draw everything to ourselves, the “owner” be damned.  God has given us a precious vineyard/planet/home, teeming with life and extraordinary resources, but we have fouled our nest, mistaking God’s gifts for our possessions.  Our greed has put our precious planet in grave danger.

If there is hope for us, it is in Jesus’ message write large across his life and death: whatever happens, love will not leave.

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Gospel Reflection for August 31, 2014, 22nd Sunday of Ordinary Time

28 Aug

“Those who want to become my followers, let them take up their cross and follow me.”

Matthew 16.24

Jesus recommends denying oneself and taking up our crosses in Sunday’s gospel.  This saying packs Jesus’ whole life into a single sentence.  Jesus does not follow God’s will only in carrying the cross.  He comes among us to heal and reveal God’s nearness and love.  He lives his mission throughout his life, even unto death.

How do we imitate Jesus’ self-giving in our lives?  Slowly, over a lifetime, I’d say.  I resist a call to martyrdom. Most of us today see no need to invent suffering.  We give our energies daily to work and family commitments.  Young parents exhaust themselves with round the clock care for a new child.  Older spouses care for one another through doctors’ appointments, blood draws, and treatments in sickness.  Daily we give ourselves in loving one another.

In what ways has giving of your life helped you find you life?

 

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Gospel Reflection for August 24, 2014, 21st Sunday of Ordinary Time

20 Aug
“Who do people say the Son of Man is?”

Matthew 16.13


What are people saying about me?  Jesus’ question is a brave one.  It’s a great interview question for potential employees.  What do your colleagues or clients say about you?  What are you proud that they say about you?

Jesus’ question to his first disciples echoes down the centuries.  Who do we say Jesus is?  A prophetic reformer who hopes to breathe life into the legalistic religion of his day?  A revolutionary whose incendiary preaching catches him in the crushing gears of empire?  Is he the greatest party giver ever who invites everyone to come to his banquets?  Is Jesus the omega point in whom all creation will converge?

What do people say about you that indicates they see you are a Christian?

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Gospel Reflection for August 17, 2014, 20th Sunday of Ordinary Time

12 Aug

“It’s not fair to take the children’s food and throw it to the dogs.”

Matthew 15.26

 

Perhaps it is the rudeness of Jesus’ words that impels Matthew to edit Mark’s earlier version of this story.  Matthew provides a reason for Jesus’ refusal to help this Gentile woman, whose daughter is tormented by a demon.  Jesus’ mission is solely “to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”

Matthew also makes the woman clearly a believer.  She addresses Jesus as messiah, “Have mercy on me, Lord, Son of David.” Her faith is the reason Jesus frees her daughter and includes her in his mission.  Matthew makes specific that the table from which the woman seeks crumbs is the messiah or master’s table.

In Mark the woman sasses back when Jesus refuses to free her daughter of an unclean spirit and refers to her as a Gentile dog.  The woman says, “Sir, even the dogs under the table eat the children’s crumbs.”  It is for saying that Jesus frees her daughter.

She counters the prejudice against her with the truth of her experience.  Unlike Jews for whom dogs were unclean, this Gentile woman has dogs as well as children at her table.  Her comeback makes space for all.

What boundaries or prejudices have you encountered and broken down?

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Gospel Reflection for August 10, 2014, 19th Sunday of Ordinary Time

6 Aug

“Lord, if this is really you, command me to come to you on the water.”

Matthew 14.28

Two spiritual heroes walk with doubt and despair in Sunday’s scripture readings.  Both the apostle Peter and the prophet Elijah live and lead in unsettled times and experience questions we are asking today.  Where is God in this mess?  Where is Jesus in this cross wind?

When Peter sees Jesus walking on the sea near his boat, he puts Jesus to a test.  “If this is really you, command me to come to you on the water.”  Jesus says, “Come.”  Stepping into the water and the future requires faith for Peter and all who follow.  Boldly Peter steps out of the boat, outside the comfortable circle of friends and disciples.  Immediately strong head winds and great waves frighten Peter and he falters, crying out, “Lord, save me.”  Jesus reaches out his hand.

Where are you in over your head?  What are you crying out about? 

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