Tag Archives: the bible

Gospel Reflection for October 19, 2014, 29th Sunday of Ordinary Time

15 Oct

“Whose image is this and whose inscription?”

Matthew 22.20

In Sunday’s gospel Jesus confronts a worldview about who images God–Caesar or the human person.  Jesus insists we cannot keep separate our obligations to God and those to government.  God blesses and calls us to integrate the spheres of our lives and image the One who made us.

Christians image God by helping people who are poor, caring for the abused and sick, visiting the imprisoned, grieving with those who mourn, and listening attentively to those who ache.  Our advocacy for just and compassionate government policies toward the poor, toward health care, education, and immigration are examples of how we carry the image of God into the civil sphere.

How do you see God imaged in yourself?

Sunday Scripture Readings: Isaiah 45.1,4-6; 1 Thessalonians 1.1-5; Matthew 22.15-21

If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection,
please visit the Sunday By Sunday page
to order a subscription or request a free sample.
Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Gospel Reflection for September 21, 2014, 25th Sunday of Ordinary Time

15 Sep

“These workers last hired have worked only one hour and you have made them equal to us who have borne the burden of the day and the scorching heat.”

 Matthew 20.12

When the 11th-hour workers get a full day’s wage, the owner of the vineyard reorients the parable.  It is no longer about the wages workers deserve but about the owner’s generosity and a Christian social order.  The vineyard owner has a unique pay scale that shows a preferential option for the last, the poorest of the workers.  The social order of the vineyard is like a circle, in which no one has a place of privilege.

How is the owner like God?

If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection,
please visit the Sunday By Sunday page
to order a subscription or request a free sample.
Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Gospel Reflection for August 31, 2014, 22nd Sunday of Ordinary Time

28 Aug

“Those who want to become my followers, let them take up their cross and follow me.”

Matthew 16.24

Jesus recommends denying oneself and taking up our crosses in Sunday’s gospel.  This saying packs Jesus’ whole life into a single sentence.  Jesus does not follow God’s will only in carrying the cross.  He comes among us to heal and reveal God’s nearness and love.  He lives his mission throughout his life, even unto death.

How do we imitate Jesus’ self-giving in our lives?  Slowly, over a lifetime, I’d say.  I resist a call to martyrdom. Most of us today see no need to invent suffering.  We give our energies daily to work and family commitments.  Young parents exhaust themselves with round the clock care for a new child.  Older spouses care for one another through doctors’ appointments, blood draws, and treatments in sickness.  Daily we give ourselves in loving one another.

In what ways has giving of your life helped you find you life?

 

If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection,
please visit the Sunday By Sunday page
to order a subscription or request a free sample.
Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Gospel Reflection for August 24, 2014, 21st Sunday of Ordinary Time

20 Aug
“Who do people say the Son of Man is?”

Matthew 16.13


What are people saying about me?  Jesus’ question is a brave one.  It’s a great interview question for potential employees.  What do your colleagues or clients say about you?  What are you proud that they say about you?

Jesus’ question to his first disciples echoes down the centuries.  Who do we say Jesus is?  A prophetic reformer who hopes to breathe life into the legalistic religion of his day?  A revolutionary whose incendiary preaching catches him in the crushing gears of empire?  Is he the greatest party giver ever who invites everyone to come to his banquets?  Is Jesus the omega point in whom all creation will converge?

What do people say about you that indicates they see you are a Christian?

 If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection,
please visit the Sunday By Sunday page
to order a subscription or request a free sample.
Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Gospel Reflection for August 17, 2014, 20th Sunday of Ordinary Time

12 Aug

“It’s not fair to take the children’s food and throw it to the dogs.”

Matthew 15.26

 

Perhaps it is the rudeness of Jesus’ words that impels Matthew to edit Mark’s earlier version of this story.  Matthew provides a reason for Jesus’ refusal to help this Gentile woman, whose daughter is tormented by a demon.  Jesus’ mission is solely “to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”

Matthew also makes the woman clearly a believer.  She addresses Jesus as messiah, “Have mercy on me, Lord, Son of David.” Her faith is the reason Jesus frees her daughter and includes her in his mission.  Matthew makes specific that the table from which the woman seeks crumbs is the messiah or master’s table.

In Mark the woman sasses back when Jesus refuses to free her daughter of an unclean spirit and refers to her as a Gentile dog.  The woman says, “Sir, even the dogs under the table eat the children’s crumbs.”  It is for saying that Jesus frees her daughter.

She counters the prejudice against her with the truth of her experience.  Unlike Jews for whom dogs were unclean, this Gentile woman has dogs as well as children at her table.  Her comeback makes space for all.

What boundaries or prejudices have you encountered and broken down?

 If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection,
please visit the Sunday By Sunday page
to order a subscription or request a free sample.

Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Gospel Reflection for August 3, 2014, 18th Sunday of Ordinary Time

31 Jul
The kingdom of heaven is like a treasure hidden in a field, which a man found and hid; then in his joy he goes and sells all that he has and buys that field.

Matthew 13.44


As a teaching method, Jesus repeatedly explores the kingdom of heaven by comparing it to real life stories and concrete images.  A parable links the daily and familiar with the mystery of God that is beyond all knowing.  This means our experience cracks open the door to they mystery of God.  It means we encounter God is our daily life.

To make Jesus known, to evangelize, Pope Francis challenges us to create a new language of parables in his exhortation Joy of the Gospel, “Be bold enough to discover new signs and new symbols, new flesh to embody and communicate the word and different forms of beauty that are valued in different cultural settings (#167).

To what in your experience might you compare the kingdom of heaven?

 

 If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection,
please visit the Sunday By Sunday page
to order a subscription or request a free sample.
Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Gospel Reflection for July 27, 2014, 17th Sunday of Ordinary Time

23 Jul
The kingdom of heaven is like a net thrown into the sea, which collects fish of every kind.  When it is full, they haul it ashore and sit down to put what is good in buckets.  What is bad they throw away.

Matthew 13.47-48


Matthew never knows when to quit.  Rather than end his chapter full of parables with the promise of a hundredfold yield or with the farmer and merchant who find their treasure, Matthew includes in chapter 13 the story of a net full of fish that need sorting.  Perhaps the Christians for whom he wrote are sorting themselves out.  Some choose to open their hearts as good ground to receive Jesus’ word.  Perhaps some cannot see in Jesus a treasure worth their lives and wholehearted commitment.

Jesus’ parables don’t boss us.  Instead parables challenge us to work on what they reveal about ourselves.  They call us to throw out the useless in our lives and embrace all that gives life.

What treasure do you seek?  What does it reveal about you?

 

 If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection,
please visit the Sunday By Sunday page
to order a subscription or request a free sample.
Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Gospel Reflection for June 15, 2014, Trinity Sunday

10 Jun

“God so loved the world, that God gave the only Son, that whoever believes in him may not die but have eternal life.”

John 3.16

God is the shared life at the heart of the universe, three in one love.  We must constantly be aware that when we use language to name God, we are using metaphors.  When we call God father, we are saying God is like fathers we know.  We, and the scriptures, also call God mother, friend, and lover.  These, too, are only images.

Many people, especially women, experience a problem in our use of so much male language to name God.  Sometimes maleness seems the essence of the triune God.  As some theologians point out, if God is male, then the male is God.  None of us wants to limit God to being in our own image, and especially not to just one gender image.  It is important to name God as richly and fully as we can.

What names of God have meaning for you and have helped you call on God in times of difficulty or joy?

 If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection,
please visit the Sunday By Sunday page
to order a subscription or request a free sample.
Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Gospel Reflection for June 8, 2014, Pentecost

3 Jun
 Jesus said to his disciples, “Peace be with you.  As the Father has sent me, so I send you.”

John 20.21


In this Easter appearance Jesus gives his friends a purpose that makes the passage a fitting Pentecost gospel. Jesus sends disciples as the Father sent him. He commissions them and us to continue his mission. For this purpose Jesus breathes his animating Spirit upon them just as the Creator breathed life into the first humans in Genesis 2.24.

What nudgings of the Spirit do you perceive recurring in you?  How do you respond?

 

 If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection,
please visit the Sunday By Sunday page
to order a subscription or request a free sample.
Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Gospel Reflection for May 4, 2014, Third Sunday of Easter

29 Apr

Two disciples were walking from Jerusalem to Emmaus and began talking to a stranger about Jesus’ death and all that had transpired since that time.  They did not recognize that the stranger was the risen Jesus.

While Jesus sat with the two disciples, he took bread, blessed it, broke it, and gave it to them.  Their eyes were opened, and they recognized, him but he vanished from their sight.

Luke 24.30-31


The mystery of God’s ways escapes the two disciples, even though Jesus had told his disciples three times that in Jerusalem he would suffer, die, and be raised up.  The disciples’ expect that their journey with Jesus will end in earthly triumph, which blinds them to the presence of God in the unprecedented and bewildering events unfolding around them.  They handle their confusion by retreating to a comfortable place they once came from.

When have your expectations blinded you to the presence of God at work in your life?

 If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection,
please visit the Sunday By Sunday page
to order a subscription or request a free sample.
Start a small bible study. Be a leader.
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,439 other followers

%d bloggers like this: