Tag Archives: faith

A Prayer For Today

20 Jul

New Beginnings

Spirit of Life, bless us as we enter this new time,
and as we bless one another in peace.
In this time of hope we wish to affirm life for all.
We commit ourselves again
to bring your hope of freedom
to all who suffer despair.
Fill us with a thirst for your justice
and teach us to move beyond
reliance on empty promises and false hopes.

Spirit of Life, renew our vision of a different possibility,
a different world.
Open the eyes of those who are fed
to the cries of the hungry.
Move the hearts of those who are whole
to offer healing to those who suffer.
Turn our eyes inward and outward
to the beauties within and without.
Help us to care for your presence
in the sap-filled plants, in the soaring birds,
in the murmuring ocean
in the gurgling streams with their families of fish,
and in our own hearts,
often broken, sometimes healed.

Spirit of Life, renew our dreams.
Help us to attend to your voice
and to know your call amid all the others.
Repair our dreams for the future
when they have become ragged.

Bless all the women of the future,
and grant them loving and listening friends and family.
Open for them a way of peace
so that their children and their children’s children
may receive an inheritance
of womanly grace and hope.
Amen, We Pray. Amen

– Hildegarde of Bingen


We send you this prayer from a 12th century woman to bless your day. It is found in Praying with the Woman Mystics by Mary T. Malone (The Columba Press, 2006).

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Gospel Reflection for July 1, 2018, 13th Sunday Ordinary Time

27 Jun

Sunday Readings: Wisdom 1.13-15; 2.23-34; 2 Corinthians 8.7,9,13-15; Mark 5.21-43

“The woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling, fell down before Jesus, and told him the whole truth.”  – Mark 5.33

Jesus took the girl by the hand and said to her, “Talitha cum,” which means,”Little girl, arise.” And immediately the girl got up and began to walk about (she was 12 years of age). At this they were overcome with amazement. – Mark 5.41-42

In Sunday’s gospel, the gospel writer Mark deliberately tells the stories of two daughters as a story within a story. Both stories involve generations–the stories of Jairus and his blood daughter and Jesus and a faith daughter.  Jairus falls at Jesus’ feet and begs Jesus to heal his 12-year-old daughter who lingers near death. On his way a woman desperate to stop a 12-year flow of blood makes a last ditch effort for healing. She touches Jesus’ clothes, is healed, and gives witness in the midst of the crowd to all that has happened to her. Jesus recognizes her faith and call her daughter. Jairus and his wife fear for their daughter’s life. Jesus raises her up. Both stories end in amazement, the threshold where faith in Jesus begins.

What witness do you give to Jesus’ importance in your life?


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Gospel Reflection for March 18, 2018, 5th Sunday of Lent

12 Mar

Scripture Readings: Jeremiah 31.31-34, Hebrews 5.7-9, John 12.20-33

“Amen, amen, I say to you, unless the grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies, it remains alone. But if it dies, it will bear much fruit.”  – John 12.24

The grain of wheat metaphor in John’s gospel uses the transforming process we call growth to help us understand all Jesus’ death and resurrection promises us. In the growth process, warmth and moisture swell a seed poked down in the soil until the life secreted within it bursts its hull. Actually, the seeds doesn’t fall into the earth and die but rather germinates. It swells with more life than the seed can hold. A new sprout pushes above ground into sunlight at the same time roots spread out underground in search of nourishment. With rain and sun, a grain of wheat grows a stalk that heads out with a hundredfold new seeds. The short life cycle of seeds dramatizes all that happens in the human life cycle, but the planting that we do in loving our children, teaching our students, being faithful in our relationships takes years to flourish.

The hour of Jesus’ death is a dynamic process, a passing over, a planting that will bear fruit hundredfold like the wheat. At the heart of Christian faith is Jesus’ life-giving resurrection from his self-giving death. Jesus challenges us to follow his self-giving way, to love and serve one another and in doing so lifting others up.

What seeds of hope are you planting with your life?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or request a free sample. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Faith is Believing and Beloving

27 Feb

We all wrestle with faith. Do we have enough? Are we losing it? Sister Joan gives you some solid ground to stand on in this short video. Blessings on this second week of Lent.

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Gospel Reflection for February 11, 2018, 6th Sunday Ordinary Time

5 Feb

Scripture Readings: Leviticus 13.1-2, 44-46; 1 Corinthians 10.31-11.1; Mark 1.40-45

“A leper came to Jesus, imploring him urgently and kneeling as he spoke, ‘If you choose, you can make me clean.’ Moved with pity, Jesus stretched out his hand and touched him. ‘I do choose. Be made clean.'”  – Mark 1.40-41
 
In Jesus’ time leprosy made its sufferers outsiders, obligated to stay away from others. Leprosy lumped together various skin conditions that like race, gender, age, and other realities show visibly on the body. Poverty can show in missing teeth and listless faces.

On the basis of appearance, we human beings start setting up boundaries between people like us and people like them, insiders and outsiders. We tend to stereotype and even demonize groups we don’t know. The voices of outsiders call for belonging among us, for equality and inclusion. The voices of those left out call us to widen our tents and lengthen our tables. In claiming justice and equality, people express their dignity as human begins made in God’s image and likeness. In healing the leper, Jesus gives voice to God’s intent for us all–wholeness and the communities love forms.

With who might you build a bridge from isolation to participation in economic life, parish life, neighborhood life, or family life?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or read samples. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Make Daily Prayer a Habit for Lent

26 Jan

Our pocket-sized prayer journal has daily prayer at your fingertips. Go to goodgroundpress.com and click on the folding prayer illustration. Download the page, follow the folding directions, and begin to make a daily prayer habit.

 

Gospel Reflection for January 21, 2018, 3rd Sunday Ordinary Time

15 Jan

Sunday Readings: Jonah 3.1-5, 10; 1 Corinthians 7.29-31; Mark 1.14-20

“Come after me, and I will make you fishers of people.” – Mark 1.17

The gospel writer Mark includes few details in the spare story of Jesus calling four fishermen to follow him. Jesus’ call is direct; their responses, quick and decisive. They do not become full-fledged disciples as fast as this, however. Mark cares about how faith develops and matures. Jesus’ disciples leave their old lives behind quickly but their faith journeys twist and turn as they walk with Jesus through fear, flight, sleep, denial, and failure. They take up their work of fishing for people only after Jesus’ death and resurrection. In the end they give their lives for the gospel.

What is your vocation in life? What have you learned through persisting in a call?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or request a free sample. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Gospel Reflection for December 24, 2017, 4th Sunday of Advent

20 Dec

Sunday Readings: 2 Samuel 7.1-5, 8-12, 14-16; Romans 26.25-27; Luke 1.26-38

“Nothing is impossible with God.” – Luke 1.37

In Mary, the Most High overshadows and dwells in a human person, intensifying God’s presence among us. The same God who created all that is makes the impossible come to be in Mary, who is young and objects to the angel she is a virgin.

With the wholehearted yes of this teenager, God will become human. She will feel the first stirrings of salvation within her womb. God’s Son will look like her. She will nurse and rock him after he is born. With Mary’s yes to God’s invitation to be Jesus’ mother, the Creator moves to make us whole.

In her Magnificat, Mary blesses God for showing mercy to her people, for raising up the poor, for filling the hungry. In saying yes, she trusts God’s promises to her people and to her.

What do you remember about how you responded to God in your teen years? How have you lived out your early response?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or request a free sample. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Mary says yes to God

20 Dec

Our Christmas gift to you are these two reflections on Mary of Nazareth: Mary’s Heart & Hearth and Fra Angelico’s The Annunciation. If it is hard to find time to pray during this busy week, let these words about Mary be your prayer.

We wish you every blessing this Christmas.

Gospel Reflection for November 5, 2017, 31st Sunday Ordinary Time

31 Oct

Sunday Readings: Malachi 1.14; 2.2, 8-10; Thessalonians 2.7-9.3; Matthew 23.1-12

“The greatest among you will be the one who serves the rest.” – Matthew 23.11

Perhaps some people in the early Christian communities claim more importance than others. When Matthew writes more than 50 years after Jesus’ death and resurrection, Christians may be living the early ideals of sharing goods and extending hospitality in mutual love with less fervor. Perhaps roles are creating rank in the household of Christ. The message in Sunday’s gospel strongly warns against being self-inflated rather than humble. It challenges us to learn from Jesus’ example and serve one another.

Today the Church has evolved as an institution with roles, robes, and ranks. Our model remains Jesus Christ, who identifies with the least and washes his friends’ feet before the last suppers as a servant. Jesus calls us to service, not station and status.

What has sustained you in the practice of serving others? What has deterred you?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or request a free sample. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

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