Tag Archives: Gospel of Luke

Summer with the Gospel Women

22 May

It’s almost summer. A good time for being with family, relaxing a little, and nourishing your soul. We suggest bringing the holy women of the Gospels into your life this summer. Here is what some of our readers say:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take a look at the Holy Women books yourself. There are sample pages at goodgroundpress.com. If you wish to order, we will get your books in the mail the next day. Call 800-232-5533 to place your order, or click on the images below to order online.

 

Luke’s Gospel: Written For Us

17 May

Beginning in June all our Sunday gospels will be from Luke. In Luke’s gospel, Jesus seeks out the lost and forgotten, gives second chances, welcomes the sinner home. Sister Joan’s new book focuses on these themes in its nine short chapters. Ideal for bible study and faith-sharing groups and for homilists. Go to goodgroundpress.com to read sample chapters. Call 800-232-5533 to place your order today or order online!

1-9 copies, $10.00 each; 10-99, $8.00; 100 or more, $7.00.


 

In both his gospel and the Acts of Apostles, Luke tells women’s stories — Mary and Martha, the widow of Nain, Mary Magdalene, Phoebe and Priscilla. You will meet them and more in word, illustrations, and prayer. Visit goodgroundpress.com to read sample chapters and to order your copy of Sister Joan’s new book, Holy Women of Luke’s Gospel. Only $8 per copy! Call 800-232-5533 to place your order today or order online!

Gospel Reflection for April 14, 2019, Passion/Palm Sunday

11 Apr

Sunday Readings: Luke 19.28-40; Isaiah 50.4-7; Philippians 2.6-11; Luke 22.14-23.56

Second criminal: “We are only paying this price for what we have done. This man has done nothing wrong. Jesus, remember me when you enter into your reign.” Jesus replied, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise.” – Luke 23.41-44

The liturgies of Holy Week give worshipers parts to act out: processing with palms, footwashing on Holy Thursday, venerating the cross on Good Friday, following the newly lit Easter candle into the dark church on Holy Saturday. We walk with Jesus to his cross and follow the women to the empty tomb at dawn on the first day of the week. This is the week to go to church and rediscover who Jesus is, stir our dead roots, and revive our commitment to mission in the world.

Luke’s passion account emphasizes Jesus’ innocence. Pilate finds no evidence of a crime. The criminal to whom Jesus talks on the cross testifies to Jesus’ innocence. “This man has done nothing wrong.” At his death the centurion at the foot of the cross expresses Luke’s view, “Surely this man was innocent.”

Innocence is a powerful agent of change. The cries of children separated from their parents at the U.S./Mexican border has awakened citizens to the immigration issues more than the plight of adults. Turning the fire hoses on children in Montgomery had the same power during the struggle for Civil Rights for African Americans. The violence we so readily justify toward one another we cannot justify doing to children.

How does violence against the innocent affect you? Imagine yourself as one of Jesus’ acquaintances or one of the women disciples who accompanied Jesus from Galilee and stands at a distance watching him crucified. What do you feel and think?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or to view sample issues. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

NEW ARRIVAL!

10 Apr

Sister Joan’s new book has arrived! Sister Joan and Sister Ansgar have collaborated for a second time on Gospel women. In both his gospel and in the Acts of Apostles, Luke tells women’s stories — Mary and Martha, the widow of Nain, Mary Magdalene, Phoebe and Priscilla. You will meet them and more in word and illustration and prayer.

Visit goodgroundpress.com to check out the table of contents and sample chapters. Order online or call 800-232-5533 to purchase your copy today!

 

Luke’s Gospel: The Whole Story

2 Apr

This year—2019—is the year of Luke. Beginning right after Easter, we hear the story of the early Church from the Acts of the Apostles. Starting in June, all the Sunday Gospels are from Luke, right up until Advent.

Study Luke’s writings along with the worshiping Church. Sister Joan’s short Bible study focuses on the themes and stories unique to Luke’s telling of the good news about Jesus. This short book, only 66 pages, is ideal for the ordinary reader, bible study groups, small Christian communities and all who want to make Sunday worship more meaningful in 2019.

Click here for the table of contents and sample chapters. 

Only $10 for orders of 1-10 copies; $8.00 for 11-99 copies. Order online at goodgroundpress.com or call 800-232-5533.


Host a Seder Supper.

Go to goodgroundpress.com to download a script of instructions for a Passover meal.

Gospel Reflection for March 31, 2019, 4th Sunday of Lent

27 Mar

Sunday Readings: Joshua 5.9, 10-12; 2 Corinthians 5.17-21; Luke 15.1-3, 11-32

“Your younger brother came, and your father killed the fatted calf because he has him back in good health.  The older son was angry and would not go in, so his father came out and begged him.” – Luke 15.27-28

For the younger, prodigal son in Sunday’s gospel, the pig trough turns out to be a holy place.  He is entirely wrong about which relationships in his life are most sustaining. He gathers fair weather, party people around him. Only when he bottoms out at the pig trough does he change his mind and heart about what he wants. His self-centered lifestyle has starved him into recognizing he needs a sustaining relationship. The younger son goes home to ask forgiveness.

One lost son is found but the older son is lost in resentment? He wants to see his brother punished. The merciful father who has welcomed one son home has to seek out and beg the older son to come to the party? Will he come? The parable does tell us.

When have you been the repentant, prodigal son? When have you been the forgiving father? When have you been the resentful son?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or to view sample issues. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Celebrate the Feast of the Annunciation

25 Mar

Sister Joan and Sister Ansgar have created a book celebrating the women of Luke’s Gospel. First among them is Mary of Nazareth, whose visit from the angel Gabriel we celebrate today. Click here to find the pages of prayer and reflection on Mary. The entire book, Holy Women of Luke’s Gospel, will be available in mid-April.

Hail, Mary. Full of grace. Blessed are you among all women.
Pray for us.


 

Visit goodgroundpress.com to pre-order your copy of Holy Women of Luke’s Gospel, or call Lacy at 800-232-5533. Only $8.00!

Gospel Reflection for March 24, 2019, 3rd Sunday of Lent

21 Mar

Gospel Reflection for March 24, 2019, 3rd Sunday of Lent

Sunday Readings: Exodus 3.1-8, 13-15; 1 Corinthians 10.1-6,10-12; Luke 13.1-9

Jesus spoke a parable. A man had a fig tree, came looking for figs, but found none. He said to the gardener, “For three years I have come looking for figs and found none. Cut it down. . .” The gardener said, “Sir, leave it one more year while I hoe around it and manure it.  Perhaps then it will bear figs.” – Luke 13.7-8

How do we see ourselves in Jesus’ parable? What to do with a tree that bears no fruit? Who likes to cut down a tree? If we think of the gardener as God, then God is nurturing, caring more about another chance to bear fruit than cutting it down. If we think of the tree as ourselves or our children, who doesn’t need or won’t give another chance to grow? A fourth, a fifth?

In the Old Testament steadfast, generative love is God’s signature characteristic. Sunday’s responsorial psalm provides one of the most famous descriptions of God: “Merciful and gracious is the Holy One, slow to anger and abounding in kindness” (103.8).

Our daily interactions cultivate conversion. Like the gardener we nourish and encourage one another. Listening to others can cultivate the fruit of compassion or courage or insight. Other believers can freshen our commitments.

In what ways are you like the owner of the fig tree? In what ways like the gardener? What or whom will you give one more chance to bear fruit? What special care with this require?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or to view sample issues. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Gospel Reflection for March 17, 2019, 2nd Sunday of Lent

15 Mar

Sunday Readings: Genesis 15.5-12,17-18; Philippians 317-4.1; Luke 9.28-36

“Suddenly two men were talking with Jesus–Moses and Elijah. Appearing in glory, they spoke of his exodus, which he was about to fulfill in Jerusalem.” – Luke 9.30-31

Jesus’ prayer on the mount of transfiguration is a turning point in his ministry. A few verses later he “sets his face for Jerusalem” (Luke 9.51). The transfiguration gospel calls us to set our sights toward Easter, to enter more deeply the mystery of Jesus’ death and resurrection, which transforms us still. Luke calls us to prayer–to take time as Jesus does in his 40 days in the wilderness to hear and integrate the Spirit’s urging into his life.

The transfiguration connects Jesus with the two prophets in Israel’s history who have interacted most intimately with God–Moses and Elijah. Like the lawgiver Moses, who led an exodus from slavery to freedom, Jesus leads an exodus from death to new life. Like the prophet Elijah, Jesus will confront the officials of temple and empire after his prayer in the silent stillness of a mountaintop.

Who like Moses and Elijah are holy people who help you envision your call into the future?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or to view sample issues. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Gospel Reflection for March 10, 2019, 1st Sunday of Lent

8 Mar

Sunday Readings: Deuteronomy 26.4-10; Romans 10.8-13; Luke 4.1-13

“Not by bread alone shall a person live.” – Luke 4.4

Turning stones to bread does not tempt Jesus. He recognizes that our relationships with others and with others nourish us as surely as food does. We humans are social beings who cannot grow out of infancy without care and who flourish in the bonds of family, friendship, and collaborative work.

In fact, Jesus always eating with people in Luke’s gospel. These meals with the messiah often turn the expectations of the righteous upside down, for Jesus welcomes and reconciles sinners at these meals. Jesus nourishes us, ultimately, by pouring out his love and life for us in meals, miracles, and the cross.

Today in North America we exercise our freedom endlessly in malls and groceries. Choices abound. What bottled water do we prefer? What flavoring do we like best in our double latte? Our choices determine personal style, but they may not nourish Christian identity. Jesus challenges us not to live by consuming alone but by choosing to lift up those who have little chance to thrive without our help.

By which of God’s words do you live? With whom do you need a renewing meal? Who might you welcome to your family table?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or to view sample issues. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

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