Tag Archives: Lazarus

Gospel Reflection for April 2, 2017, 5th Sunday of Lent

28 Mar

Scripture Readings: Ezekiel 37.12-14; Romans 8.8-11; John 11.1-45

Jesus said to Martha, “I am the resurrection and the life. Those who believe in me, even though they die, will live, and everyone who lives and believes in me will never die. Do you believe this?” Martha said to Jesus, “Yes, Lord, I believe you are the Messiah, the Son of God, the one coming into the world.” – John 11.25-27

Jesus grieves in Sunday’s gospel with three people he loves. His friends Martha and Mary believe Jesus could have saved their brother Lazarus, but he didn’t come in time. By raising Lazarus from the dead, Jesus in a sense puts himself in his friend’s place. News of this sign incites religious officials to plot Jesus’ death (John 11.45-53).

Both Martha and Mary go out to talk with Jesus when he finally comes to their house after Lazarus has been dead three days. In John’s gospel it is Martha who makes the same key proclamation of faith the in the other three gospels Peter makes. “You are the Mesiah.”

None of us knows what lies beyond death. We have only our experience of God in our world and in our holy history. Henry Nouwen compares dying to the trust between trapeze artists. One lets go, trusting the other will catch him or her. Christians are companions in hope that the God who creates and sustains the world will raise us up. We are companions in hope that the new life Jesus promises will be ours. We live in promise, not certainty. We walk with Jesus, who did not sidestep death but gave himself in trust and human unknowing.

What funerals to you remember especially? For what reasons?

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Gospel Reflection for April 6, 5th Sunday of Lent

31 Mar

Jesus said, “I am the resurrection and the life: whoever believes in me, though they will die, will come to life; and whoever is alive and believes in me will never die. Do you believe this?”

Martha responded, “Yes, Lord, I have come to believe that you are the messiah, the son of God: he who is to come into the world.”

John 11.25-27


Lazarus died before Jesus arrived to see him. When Martha and Mary meet Jesus, they each say, “Lord if you had been here, my brother never would have died.”  The repetition tells us this statement is important. Martha and Mary raise a question in the life of the early Christian community in which many expected Jesus to return in glory within their lifetimes.

Jesus’ delay in the story provides the reason for his dialog with Martha, who speaks the faith of the community that experienced this delay in history. Her brother’s death tests and transforms Martha’s faith.

Before what graves have you stood and asked as Martha and Mary do, “Why didn’t you save the one we love?”

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Gospel Reflection for September 29, 2013, 26th Sunday in Ordinary Time

25 Sep

Jesus tells the story of a poor beggar name Lazarus and a rich man.  Both died and their roles reverse.  The rich man suffers while Lazarus rests in the arms of Abraham.  The rich man asks Abraham to send Lazarus to bring him some water.

Abraham replied, “Remember how well you lived when you were alive and how miserable Lazarus was.  Now he has found comfort, but you have found torment.  He cannot help you.  Between you and us is a great abyss that no one can cross.”

Luke 16.25-26


The great abyss that yawns between Lazarus and the rich man in the abode of the dead exists already in the distance between them when they are alive.  The rich man never notices Lazarus begging nor responds to him.  He doesn’t know the other man exists.  The rich man has no idea that his riches are anything but well-deserved blessings from God.  He has no other ethic than spending his money on himself.  He builds no connection between himself and the poor man at his gate.

Who begs at your gate?

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