Tag Archives: Living the Gospel Today

Gospel Reflection for February 3, 2019, 4th Sunday Ordinary Time

28 Jan

Sunday Readings: Jeremiah 1.4-5, 17-19; 1 Corinthians 13.4-13; Luke 4.21-30

“Today this scripture is fulfilled in your hearing.” – Luke 4.21

In this statement Jesus identifies himself as the prophet the Spirit anoints to bring good news to the poor. He will fulfill the words of the prophet Isaiah. He will lives these words and gather a community that lives God’s love and mercy into the future. It is on the Sabbath in the midst of his own people in Nazareth that Jesus proclaims the Spirit, the giver of life, will work through him to heal, forgive, set free, and lift people up. Jesus will inaugurate a jubilee era in which the poor and oppressed have a new chance to thrive.

What is the sermon you try to live? Who gave it?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or view sample issues. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Gospel Reflection for January 27, 2019, 3rd Sunday Ordinary Time

25 Jan

Sunday Readings: Nehemiah 8.2-4, 5-6, 8-10; 1 Corinthians 12.12-20; Luke 1.1-4; 4.14-21

“The Spirit of the Holy One is upon me, for God has anointed me and sent me to proclaim liberty for captives, sight to the blind, release to prisoners, to announce a year of favor from the Holy One.” – Luke 4.18-19

In the first four verses of his gospel Luke tells us why he wrote the third gospel. He has investigated the events fulfilled among us and handed on by the eyewitnesses and ministers of the word from the beginning. Luke claims he has written an orderly account. The order that interests Luke is not a time line but the order of fulfillment.

The earliest Christians continue to worship in the temple, hear the words of the prophets, and pray the psalms. In these they find words that help articulate who Jesus is. In Sunday’s gospel, he pinpoint words that he will fulfill in his mission. He reads from the scroll of Isaiah:

“The Spirit of the Holy One is upon me,
for God has anointed me and sent me
to proclaim liberty for captives,
sight to the blind,
release to prisoners,
to announce a year of favor from the Holy One.”

Jesus rolls up and scroll, sits down, and begins to speak. His first words express his purpose and mission: “Today this scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing.” The Spirit anoints Jesus to announce “a year of favor,” a jubilee year when debts are forgiven, field lies fallow, and creditors return land to peasants. This is a mission not only Jesus but we his followers are called to fulfill.

How can you help fulfill Jesus’ mission where you live today?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or request a free sample. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Special Lent Offer!

10 Jan

Lent is looming. Ash Wednesday is March 6 this year. Spending time with the Gospel is a great way to keep Lent. Sunday by Sunday makes Gospel-centered faith sharing easy.

 The Sunday Gospels during Lent ask each of us —

  What transforms you? Gives you life?
  What have you done with a second chance?
  Is it the prodigal son who is lost or his older
 brother?
  Which stones should you stop throwing?



Click here to read some of the Sunday by Sunday issues for Lent. Then imagine every adult in your parish reading them, too.

Our Lent/Easter unit of eight issues is only $2.00 per unit when you order 100 units or more. Call us today at 800-232-5533 to reserve your copies of Sunday by Sunday at only $2.00 per person. We look forward to hearing from you.

Visit goodgroundpress.com to see our other Lent resources!

Gospel Reflection for January 6, 2019, Epiphany

3 Jan

Sunday Readings: Isaiah 60.1-6, Ephesians 3.2-3, 5-6, Matthew 2.1-12

Magi from the East arrive in Jerusalem, saying, “Where is the newborn king of the Jews? We observed his star at its rising and have come to pay him homage.” – Matthew 2.1-2

Only Matthew tells the story of the wise visitors from the East. They are students of the stars, interpreters of dreams, and seekers of the new messiah. The story introduces a major theme of Matthew’s gospel: The inclusion of the Gentiles in the promises of Jesus. In the 50 years between Jesus’ death and resurrection and the Matthew writing the gospel, Gentile believers had come to outnumber Jewish Christians in the community for which he wrote. Jews and Gentiles had to tolerate and, where possible, integrate their different traditions, forms of worship, and ways of understanding Jesus. To sustain the unity of their diverse community, they had to recognize that the good news and saving grace Jesus brought was for all of them.

Life is easier with people who are like us, who think the way we think, and do things the way we do. There is no mistaking the message of the Epiphany readings: God is inclusive. Every nation on earth will adore the new child, proclaims Sunday’s responsorial psalm. Jesus is born for all of us. Peace, forgiveness, and reconciliation are our work.

Who are the people from whom you descend? What do you know about how your people first journeyed to faith in Jesus?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or request a free sample. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

A New Year, A New Catalog!

2 Jan

Happy New Year! We celebrated by creating a new catalog. Click on the catalog cover above to read the pages online or click here to print and download your own copy. If you would like to place an order, you can do so by calling 800-232-5533, ordering online, or filling out and mailing the order form at the back of the catalog.

Gospel Reflection for December 2, 2018, 1st Sunday of Advent

29 Nov

Gospel Reflection for December 2, 2018, 1st Sunday of Advent

Sunday Readings: Jeremiah 33.14-16; 1 Thessalonians 3.12-4.2; Luke 21.25-28, 34-36

“Stay watchful, praying for strength to escape what will happen and to stand before the Son of Man.” – Luke 21.36

Advent begins the Church year with a gospel that fairly froths with frightful images. The gospel reminds us that no matter how threatening personal or world events, we live from beginning to end in the embrace of God. In our experience of being alive, we find God within us. In turning to one another and bridging our separate selves, we find God among us. In experiencing our human limits, we find we have heart and hope for mystery—God beyond us. The God of our beginning is the God of all we will become.

Whether we see Jesus’ coming again as a threat or a fulfillment, the gospel challenges us to stay watchful and pray for strength. In living consciously, attentive to people and life within and around us, we will find God already with us.

What gives you hope this Advent? 


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or request a free sample. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Gospel Reflection for November 4, 2018, 31st Sunday Ordinary Time

1 Nov

Scripture Readings: Deuteronomy 6.2-6; Hebrews 7.23-28; Mark 12.28-34

A scribe ask Jesus, “What is the greatest of all the commandments?” Jesus answers, “The greatest of all the commandments is ‘Hear, O Israel, the Lord your God is Lord alone. Therefore, love the Holy One your God with all your soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength.’ That is the greatest and the second is, ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.'” – Mark 12.29-30

For Jesus as for all good Jews, there was no religious obligation more sacred than to keep the Law of Moses, the commands of the Torah, all 613 of them as spelled out in the first five books of the Old Testament. Which is most important? A group of Pharisees, Herodians, and Sadducees set Jesus up with this question.

Jesus chooses wisely. His answer is what his life and teachings are all about. These are the words Jews nail on their doorways and bind to their wrists and foreheads. They are the words Jews pray every day much as Christians do the Our Father. Love is a a verb, a word we live among our neighbors and kin, especially this week of before the election with its bitter, too-often hateful debates. Jesus is debates and disagrees but without hate and demonizing.

What actions do the two great commandments inspire in your this week?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or request a free sampleStart a small bible study. Be a leader.

Gospel Reflection for October 21, 2018, 29th Sunday Ordinary Time

17 Oct

Sunday Readings: Isaiah 53.10-11; Hebrews 4.14-16; Mark 10.35-44

Jesus says to James and John, who ask to sit at his right and left hand in his kingdom, “You do not know what your are asking.  Are you able to drink the cup I will drink?”  – Mark 10.38

It’s ironic that James and John answer Jesus’ question, “We can.” They do the opposite. They forsake Jesus when he gets arrested and flee with all of Jesus’ men disciples except Peter. Peter follows Jesus until he denies even knowing him in the high priest’s courtyard. When following becomes life-threatening, neither James and John nor the others who are indignant at their ambition stay the course. Their commitment evaporates. They shrink from drinking the cup Jesus is about to drink. Who wouldn’t shrink? Mark want us to recognize that Jesus’ disciples have to grow into their commitment as we can.

At every eucharist we drink the cup that Jesus drank. We brashly say amen, this is the lifeblood of Christ poured out for us. It become part of us, a commitment to live into each day.

To what do you commit when at Mass you drink the cup that Jesus drank?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or request a free sample. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Gospel Reflection for September 30, 2018, 26th Sunday Ordinary Time

29 Sep

Sunday Readings: Numbers 11.25-29; James 5.1-6; Mark 9.38-48

“Whoever is not against us is for us.”  – Mark 9.40

Often in our disgustingly polarized times, activists, liberal and conservative, reverse Jesus’ saying and eliminate the middle ground. They insist whoever is not for us is against us. Middle ground is liminal space, valuable to preserve for exploring what we have in common with others, what they have experienced, why they think the way they do. Middle ground is where real people replace stereotypes and liberate each other from the demons of prejudice and unexamined certainty. In the news the future of our democracy depends on finding common ground and common good, cups of water in Jesus’ name all around for all in need.

To what and to whom does the name Christian obligate us?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or request a free sampleStart a small bible study. Be a leader.

Open Your Heart to the Gospels!

28 Sep

The Sunday gospels this fall have wonderful stories of encounters with Jesus. A rich young man who wants to be good. James and John who want to be first. Blind Bartimaeus who wants to see. A widow who gives her pennies to God.

Sunday by Sunday can help you pray these gospels, alone or with others. Our reflections and questions put you in the story, too. Sunday by Sunday will make an encounter with Jesus a part of your daily life.

We offer both individual and group subscriptions.
If you order today, the issues for the Sundays of October and November will be yours in a week.

Call us today — 800-232-5533. It’s the quickest way to place an order. You can read sample issues at our website — goodgroundpress.com. We hope to hear from you. Thank you.

%d bloggers like this: