Tag Archives: Sunday By Sunday

Sunday by Sunday

15 Sep

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Gospel Reflection for September 11, 2016, 24th Sunday Ordinary Time

7 Sep
Photo via Flickr user Marcia

Photo via Flickr user Marcia

Sunday Readings: Exodus 32.7-11, 13-14; 1 Timothy 1.12-17; Luke 15.1-32

“Rejoice with me because I have found my lost sheep…..Rejoice with me because I have found my lost coin.”

(Luke 15.6, 9)

Losing, finding, rejoicing — that is the pattern in each of the three parables Jesus tells in chapter 15. Who doesn’t bother to look for the sheep that has wandered apart from the hundred and has not just strayed but is lost? Who forgets a lost coin and doesn’t bother to retrieve 10% of current assets? The lost sheep and lost coin invite us to hear the story of the man with two sons with the questions, “Who is lost?” Is it the party son who wastes his inheritance and comes home to his welcoming father or is it the responsible son who resents his father’s mercy? Which son am I? Let us rejoice in Pope Francis’ reclaiming in this year of mercy the deepest mystery of who God is.

Which son are you? How are you benefiting from this year emphasizing God’s mercy?

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Gospel Reflection for August 28, 2016, 22nd Sunday Ordinary Time

23 Aug
Photo via Flickr user Stijn Nieuwendijk

Photo via Flickr user Stijn Nieuwendijk

Sunday Readings: Sirach 3.17-18, 20, 28-29; Hebrews 12.18-19, 22-24; Luke 14.1, 7-14

“When you give a banquet, invite the poor, the crippled, the lame, and the blind. You will be blessed, because they cannot repay you.”

(Luke 14.12-13)

Jesus’ two healings on the Sabbath demonstrate God’s will for human beings. We read neither story among the Sunday gospels. Jesus straightens up a woman who for 18 years has been bent over in Luke 13.10-17 and heals a moan with dropsy (14.2-6). He restores them to praise and worship rather than leaving them among the forgotten whom God supposedly punishes. In his advice for making guest lists, Jesus prefers those who cannot repay their hosts with a return invitation and place of honor at their tables. Jesus wants us to widen the circle of those who eat at our tables to include people like the two he has just healed. He wants our guest lists to distribute food justly rather than cut people off as chronically inferior, deserving distance from us rather than place among us.

What places of honor might you give up? What would you lose or gain? Who might you add to your guest list? What would you lose or gain?

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Gospel Reflection for August 21, 2016, 21st Sunday Ordinary Time

16 Aug
Photo via Flickr user Sailesh Vaghela

Photo via Flickr user Sailesh Vaghela

Sunday Readings: Isaiah 66.18-21; Hebrews 12.5-7, 11-13; Luke 13.22-30

“Strive to enter through the narrow door.”

(Luke 13.24)

A door or gate always represents choice. As long as a room has a door, we can enter and exit it. We can choose to go in and choose to leave, to enclose or expand ourselves. A doorway or threshold is a liminal space, which stand between inside and outside, between life as we know it and life as Jesus promises it. In Sunday’s gospel Jesus crosses a threshold in his ministry when he sets his face for Jerusalem. As he goes on his way, Jesus teaches; his teaching has the authenticity of one who lives his word. Jesus is on his way to his Father through the narrow door of his own suffering and death.

Who beckons you to participate actively in your community of faith? What door do you want to open or close?

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Gospel Reflection for August 14, 2016, 19th Sunday Ordinary Time

9 Aug

Sunday Readings: Jeremiah 38.4-6, 8-10; Hebrews 12.1-4; Luke 12.49-53

“I came to bring fire to the earth…I have baptism with which to be baptized, and what stress I am under until it is completed!”

(Luke 12.49)

When the evangelist Luke writes about A.D. 85, Jesus has completed his baptism — his suffering, death, resurrection, and return to God, but he has not come again in glory. Meanwhile Christian faith has spread not only among Jews but among Gentiles and created conflicts. Baptism is one such conflict. Among Gentiles baptism takes the place of circumcision but some Pharisees who have become Christians object. They think Gentiles should be circumcised and instructed in keeping the law of Moses.

The gospel anticipates dividing fires will persist. In his follow up the Synod of the Family that met in 2014 and 2015, Pope Francis invites the Church today into tough conversations that air differences. In this Jubilee Year of Mercy Pope Francis invokes the principle that “time is greater than space.” He favors processes that make room over time for mercy and grace to work in our lives.

What value do you experience in talking about difficult, even divisive, questions? How does time make room for grace to work?

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Gospel Reflection for August 7, 2016, 19th Sunday Ordinary Time

4 Aug
Photo via Flickr user jd_09

Photo via Flickr user jd_09

Sunday Readings: Wisdom 18.6-9; Hebrews 11.1-2, 8-10; Luke 12.32-48

“If a householder could know just when the thief would break in, the householder would never leave the house to be broken into? You have to be ready the same way, for the Son of Man will come at an hour you don’t expect. Who is the faithful and wise servant the master can leave in charge of the household to keep everyone fed on schedule?” 

(Luke 12.39, 42)

Luke seems compelled to gather together sayings and parables to provide a spirituality for waiting for Jesus’ glorious return. Many early Christians expected Jesus’ second coming to be immanent. Its delay forced believers to question their faith. In Sunday’s gospel Luke speaks to a church whose leaders seem to teeter on the brink of despair. What commitments are worth ultimate trust? Jesus counsels us to keep our lamps burning. The kingdom may startle us, erupting as suddenly as a thief breaking in. This is a time to store up inexhaustible treasure in heaven.

What in the way you live each day indicates where your heart is?

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Gospel Reflection for July 31, 2016, 18th Sunday Ordinary Time

26 Jul
Photo via Flickr user Phil Dolby

Photo via Flickr user Phil Dolby

Sunday Readings: Ecclesiastes 1.2, 2.21-23; Colossians 3.1-5, 9-11; Luke 12.13-21

The land of a rich man produced abundantly. And he thought to himself, “What shall I do, for I have no place to store my crops?” Then he said, “I will do this: I will pull down my barns and build larger ones and there I will store all my grain and my goods. And I will say to my soul, Soul, you have ample good laid up for many years; relax, eat, drink, and be merry.”

(Luke 12.16-19)

From God’s point of view a surplus harvest is not to provide one person with secure access to food, drink, and merriment for years to come. It can benefit people without enough. For Luke wealth is not a sign of God’s favor but of danger. It is not good or bad in itself but faces the person with a choice to act for good or for evil. For Luke, God clearly holds the ultimate power to redistribute the wealth of people who will not share. This is the fate of the rich fool who must leave his full barns behind and face God with whom he has stored up no treasure.

When and how has your giving connected you with others?

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Gospel Reflection for July 24, 2016, 17th Sunday Ordinary Time

20 Jul

Scripture Readings: Genesis 18.20-32; Colossians 2.12-14; Luke 11.1-13

Jesus said, “Say this when you pray: Father, may you name be held holy; your kingdom come…”

Jesus encourages us to pray for “the kingdom,” the vision he has for a just and loving society and world. To pray that God’s name be hallowed and that God’s kingdom come is to acknowledge that all barriers to love must be dissolved. Anything that separates race from race, rich from poor, gender from gender, age group from age group, Christian from non-Christian is a barrier to the holiness God wishes to share with believers. Biases have no place in the community that names God our father.  Especially as protests and politics set us against one another, we must cherish all we have in common and respect one another.

Make today a day to act out the Our Father and talk with folks who seem different from yourself. Pray for someone with whom you are angry or hurt.

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Gospel Reflection for July 17, 2016, 16th Sunday Ordinary Time

12 Jul
Photo via Flickr user Jim Forest

Photo via Flickr user Jim Forest

Sunday Readings: Genesis 18.1-10; Colossians 1.24-28; Luke 10.38-42

“Jesus entered a village where a woman named Martha welcomed him to her home. She had a sister named Mary, who seated herself at the Lord’s feet and listened to his teachings.”

(Luke 10.38-39)

Luke puts Mary and Martha in their place in Sunday’s gospel passage. To be remembered by name in the gospel makes people stand out. Perhaps tradition remembers Martha and Mary because their home was not only a place Jesus stayed during his lifetime but a house church, where after Jesus’ resurrection, Martha welcomed a community of disciples to remember his teaching and break bread as he asked. John’s gospel also remembers Martha for gathering Jesus, her sister, her brother Lazarus, and friends for a meal (John 12.1-2).

In Sunday’s gospel Mary seats herself at Jesus’ feet to listen to his teaching and Martha serves him. These two actions — listening to Jesus’ words and serving a meal — are the same actions that take place in the Liturgy of the Word and the Liturgy of the Eucharist. Perhaps Martha and Mary represent two forms of ministry evolving in the Christian community at the time Luke wrote — preaching the good news and gathering the community to break bread. In Acts 6.1-6, the twelve appoint deacons to serve and make sure all in the Jerusalem community get a fair amount of food, so that the twelve are free to preach. Perhaps by the time Luke writes in the mid-80s, the ministries of women in the Christian communities has become controversial.

Although Sunday’s gospel shows Martha offering table hospitality and Mary listening to the word, this scene effectively silences the ministries of both women. Jesus tells Martha to give up the ministry of her household, and perhaps her house church , and join her sister in choosing the better part–silent listening to Jesus. Perhaps their ministries of word and table made Martha and Mary too memorable in the life of the early Christian community to forget. Perhaps they were so important that Luke uses the voice of Jesus’ authority to put them in their place, the same subordinate position women are transforming today.

Who sustains the life of your faith community?

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Image 9 Jul

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