A Prayer For Today

20 Jul

New Beginnings

Spirit of Life, bless us as we enter this new time,
and as we bless one another in peace.
In this time of hope we wish to affirm life for all.
We commit ourselves again
to bring your hope of freedom
to all who suffer despair.
Fill us with a thirst for your justice
and teach us to move beyond
reliance on empty promises and false hopes.

Spirit of Life, renew our vision of a different possibility,
a different world.
Open the eyes of those who are fed
to the cries of the hungry.
Move the hearts of those who are whole
to offer healing to those who suffer.
Turn our eyes inward and outward
to the beauties within and without.
Help us to care for your presence
in the sap-filled plants, in the soaring birds,
in the murmuring ocean
in the gurgling streams with their families of fish,
and in our own hearts,
often broken, sometimes healed.

Spirit of Life, renew our dreams.
Help us to attend to your voice
and to know your call amid all the others.
Repair our dreams for the future
when they have become ragged.

Bless all the women of the future,
and grant them loving and listening friends and family.
Open for them a way of peace
so that their children and their children’s children
may receive an inheritance
of womanly grace and hope.
Amen, We Pray. Amen

– Hildegarde of Bingen


We send you this prayer from a 12th century woman to bless your day. It is found in Praying with the Woman Mystics by Mary T. Malone (The Columba Press, 2006).

Visit goodgroundpress.com for daily prayers and blessings.

Gospel Reflection for July 22, 2018, 16th Sunday Ordinary Time

18 Jul

Sunday Readings: Jeremiah 23.1-6; Ephesians 2.13-18; Mark 6.30-34

“As he went ashore, Jesus saw a great crowd. His heart is moved with pity for them because they were like sheep without a shepherd. He began to teach them many things.” – Mark 6.34

In Sunday’s gospel the twelve return from the mission to preach and heal which Jesus sent them out to do in last Sunday’s gospel. They come back woofed. Jesus’ growing popularity surrounds them with crowds and keeps them from eating let alone resting. Mark often creates literary sandwiches, a story within a story. Last Sunday’s gospel served us the first slice of story–Jesus sending the twelve out in pairs; this Sunday we hear the second slice of story–the return of the twelve. We don’t hear the 17 verses that form the meat in the middle of the sandwich. These verses tell the story of John the Baptist’s senseless and gruesome beheading. They do more than supply time for the twelve to be out on mission. The story of John the Baptist’s tells us the twelve have embarked on the same mission that cost the Baptist and Jesus their lives. It foreshadows the cost of prophetic ministry.

Jesus cannot shut off his compassion to the people to come to him in droves. The gospel call us to preach the good news with our lives, to turn on our compassion, not turn it off.

When has pity or compassion moved you to action?


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Gospel Reflection for July 15, 2018, 15th Sunday Ordinary Time

12 Jul

Sunday Readings: Amos 7.12-15; Ephesians 1.2-14; Mark 6.7-13

“So the twelve went out and proclaimed that all should repent. They cast out demons, and anointed with oil many who were sick and cured them.” – Mark 6.12-13

Jesus sends the twelve men disciples out to become one with the people in villages near Nazareth, to stay with them, and depend on their hospitality. Their actions  cultivate community in three ways. First, they preach repentance, turning toward God, opening one’s heart to the Spirit’s stirrings in us, opening our eyes to the holy in which we live. Second, the twelve cast out demons. Today we might call demons destructive drives and addictions that keep us from possessing ourselves and that erode our capacity to love others. Third, the twelve anoint and heal the sick as Jesus did.

We continue Jesus’ mission in our time just as the twelve do in Sunday’s gospel. We an testify to God’s presence in our lives. We can listen to and support friends and family members change their lives from too much work or drink, or too little voice or purpose. We can accompany the sick and elderly.

How do you continue Jesus’ mission?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or request a free sample. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Blessings on this Fourth of July!

4 Jul

Photo via Flickr user littlestar19

 

Our 4th Of July blessing is the final two stanzas from the poem “One Today” by Richard Blanco, composed for President Obama’s second inauguration. We are all together under one sky in this nation and in our church, with hope waiting for us to name it. Thank you for being a blessing to all of us at Good Ground Press.

One sky, toward which we sometimes lift our eyes
tired from work: some days guessing at the weather
of our lives, some days giving thanks for a love
that loves you back, sometimes praising a mother
who knew how to give, or forgiving a father
who couldn’t give what you wanted.

We head home: through the gloss of rain or weight
of snow, or the plum blush of dusk, but always–home,
always under one sky, our sky.  And always one moon
like a silent drum tapping on every rooftop
and every window, of one country–all of us–
facing the stars
hope–a new constellation
waiting for us to map it,
waiting for us to name it — together.


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Gospel Reflection for July 8, 2018, 14th Sunday Ordinary Time

3 Jul

Scripture Readings: Ezekiel 2.2-5; 2 Corinthians 12.7-10; Mark 6.1-6

“Jesus was amazed at their unbelief.” – Mark 6.6

When Jesus preaches in his hometown synagogue, his neighbors experience his astonishing wisdom but quickly dismiss his gifts. Their certainty and cynicism quickly tame their amazement at his preaching and healing. Jesus is a carpenter and no prophet. They cannot recognize God present in one of their own. Theologian Bernard Lonergan says, “The opposite of faith is not doubt but certainty.” Many of us shun controversy and debate, especially in our polarized times. We have to ask ourselves what we are too certain about to question and rethink.

What phrases do you use in conversations to let people know you are open to listening and conversing? 


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or request a free sample. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Gospel Reflection for July 1, 2018, 13th Sunday Ordinary Time

27 Jun

Sunday Readings: Wisdom 1.13-15; 2.23-34; 2 Corinthians 8.7,9,13-15; Mark 5.21-43

“The woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling, fell down before Jesus, and told him the whole truth.”  – Mark 5.33

Jesus took the girl by the hand and said to her, “Talitha cum,” which means,”Little girl, arise.” And immediately the girl got up and began to walk about (she was 12 years of age). At this they were overcome with amazement. – Mark 5.41-42

In Sunday’s gospel, the gospel writer Mark deliberately tells the stories of two daughters as a story within a story. Both stories involve generations–the stories of Jairus and his blood daughter and Jesus and a faith daughter.  Jairus falls at Jesus’ feet and begs Jesus to heal his 12-year-old daughter who lingers near death. On his way a woman desperate to stop a 12-year flow of blood makes a last ditch effort for healing. She touches Jesus’ clothes, is healed, and gives witness in the midst of the crowd to all that has happened to her. Jesus recognizes her faith and call her daughter. Jairus and his wife fear for their daughter’s life. Jesus raises her up. Both stories end in amazement, the threshold where faith in Jesus begins.

What witness do you give to Jesus’ importance in your life?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or request a free sample. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

Gospel Reflection for June 24, 2018, Birth of John the Baptist

18 Jun

Gospel Reflection for June 24, 2018, Birth of John the Baptist

Sunday Readings: Isaiah 49.1-6; Acts 13.22-26; Luke 1.57-66, 80

On the eighth day Elizabeth and Zachariah came to circumcise the child, and they were going to name him after Zachariah after his father. But his mother said, “No; he is to be called John.” They said to her, “None of your relatives has this name. Then they began to motion to his father to find out what name he wanted to give him. He asked for a writing tablet wrote, “His name is John.” Immediately his mouth was opened and his tongue freed and he began to speak, praising God.  – Luke 1.59-64

John is not unique in having God at work in his early life to prepare him for his vocation. John is not to follow his father into service as a priest of the temple. He lives apart from his culture and family and walks with God in the desert. He cultivates an awareness of God at work in him. In fewer than 30 words, Sunday’s gospel characterizes John’s 30 years of life prior to his public ministry as becoming “strong in spirit.” He needs strength for his prophetic vocation of preparing Jesus way. John offers us a model for activating the prophetic vocation that comes with our baptisms.

What strength of spirit do you have? Who challenges you to live gospel values?


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Gospel Reflection for June 17, 2018, 11th Sunday Ordinary Time

12 Jun

Scripture Readings: Ezekiel 17.22-24; 2 Corinthians 5.6-10; Mark 4.26-34

“This is how it is with the reign of God. A farmer scatters seed on the ground, goes to bed, and gets up day after day. Through it all the seeds sprouts and grows without the farmer knowing how it happens.” – Mark 4.26-37

A farmer in Jesus’ time and all of us who grow plants today inherit the leap from ocean to land that early cellular life made. We can ready the field, sow the seed, and sleep awhile. It’s organic. Seeds have it in their DNA how to grow and mature with rain and sun. We live in a dynamic, evolving world in which all that is has the capacity to become more, to self-organize into new wholes. We humans live and thrive in relationship with others–in mutual, reciprocal love for family, friends, neighbors. Who do we count as neighbors, we Christians who embrace the moral challenge to do unto others what we do for ourselves–to act like one human family?

I am feeling shame these days that the law of our land requires splitting up parents and children at the Mexican border. Kids are crying there and all over the country where deportation is happening. Who has a stomach for cruelty to little kids? One can go bed and let the consequences play out while we sleep. Yet who of us like these children’s parents does not want safety, education, and a good life for their children? That’s what I want for my family. That’s what the kin*dom of God is like.

What’s in our Christian DNA? What can each of us do today to make caring the hallmark of our civil society?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or request a free sample. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

The Gospel of Mark At Your Fingertips

7 Jun

If you are a Sunday by Sunday subscriber, you will notice we start reading from Mark’s Gospel again this coming Sunday. You can enhance your understanding of how the weekly excerpts we hear at Sunday Eucharist fit into the overall themes of Mark with Sister Joan’s easy-to-read book.

The 11 short chapters of Sister Joan’s book make it ideal for Bible study groups or for individuals. The emphasis on Mark’s uniqueness among the four Gospel writers are helpful for homilists.

And the price is right — only $10.00. Click here to read the Table of Contents and a sample chapter. Order at goodgroundpress.com or call 800-232-5533.

Gospel Reflection for June 10, 2018, 10th Sunday Ordinary Time

6 Jun

Sunday Readings: Genesis 3.9-15; 2 Corinthians 4.13-5.1; Mark 3.20-35

“Whoever does the will of God is my brother, sister, and mother.”  – Mark 3.35

Jesus is the talk of Galilee in the early chapters of Mark’s gospel. Only Mark tells this story in which enthusiastic crowds make neighbors his family question Jesus’ sanity. What makes neighbors think Jesus is out of his mind? He is saying the kingdom of God is near, casting out demons, healing the sick, and eating with sinners and tax collectors who don’t keep the religious laws.

Scribes from Jerusalem question by whose power Jesus preaches and heals? Jesus argues that it can’t be Satan freeing people from their demons, their destructive drives. The freedom and healing Jesus bring among the people manifest the Spirit of God drives him. To not see the Spirit in Jesus nor find the Spirit at work in ourselves is to refuse God’s love and God’s gift of our very selves and our lives. It’s a dead end beyond forgiveness. Whereas whoever has faith in God is family to Jesus.

What do Jesus’ words and actions reveal about who God is?


If you enjoy this Gospel Reflection, please visit the Sunday By Sunday page to order a subscription or request a free sample. Start a small bible study. Be a leader.

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