Tag Archives: Eucharist

Gospel Reflection for August 26, 2018, 21st Sunday Ordinary Time

23 Aug

Sunday Readings: Joshua 24.1-2, 15-17, 18; Ephesians 5.21-32; john 6.60-69

“The words I have spoken are spirit and life. But there are some among you who do not believe,” Jesus says. Many of his disciples turned back and no longer went about with him. Jesus said the the twelve: “Do you also want to leave?” Simon Peter said, “Master, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life? We have come to believe and are convinced that you are the Holy One of God.”

In John’s gospel the multiplication of the loaves and fish sets off a long reflection on bread and wine as the signs of Jesus’ presence with us. Those who believe Jesus comes from God and is the living bread from heaven participate in this sacrament of his love. The reflection draws an increasingly sharp line between believers and unbelievers over the course of the 71 verses in the chapter. John wrote in the midst of contentious relationships between Jews who follow Jesus and those who follow others rabbis and eventually split into two great world religions.

Jesus does not offer ordinary bread and wine, but rather the transforming experience of entering into new life with him. Can we imagine ourselves standing in the company of the disciples trying to comprehend the mystery of this bread and wine and Jesus’ continuing presence in these signs of eating and drinking. “Do you want to leave?” Jesus asks. We live in the dynamic tension between that question and our new lives. We know how Peter answers. How do we answer?

How does participating in eucharist help transform your life?


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Gospel Reflection for August 18, 2018, 20th Sunday Ordinary Time

16 Aug

Scripture Readings: Proverbs 9.1-6; Ephesians 5.15-20; John 6.56-57

“Those who eat this bread and drink my blood abide in me, and I in them. Just as the living Father sent me, and I live because of the Father, so whoever eats me will live because of me. The one who eats this bread will live forever.” – John 6.58

Sometimes people speak of food and drinks as if they have a relationship. I just love peanuts. Or, I like pizza but it doesn’t like me. What if there really is a food that is a sign of a real relationship? Jesus makes bread a sign of himself and his self-giving actions, so eating the bread means having faith in him. Sharing the bread summons all who eat it  into relationship with all who believe, the whole body of Christ. It calls us into holy communion with one another. Eucharist is never solitary, me and Jesus. The bread is broken and shared; it is about solidarity.

How does joining in Eucharist give you life?


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Gospel Reflection for June 18, 2017, Feast of the Body and Blood of Christ

13 Jun

Photo via Flickr user wplynn

Scripture Readings: Deuteronomy 8.2-3, 14-16; 1 Corinthians 10.16-17; John 6.51-58

“Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood abide in me, and I in them.” – John 6.56

We misunderstand Jesus if we think the eating bread and drinking wine that Christians do is cannibalism. However, Jesus did choose eating and drinking as the signs through which his followers can identify with him and his wholehearted giving of himself in his death. In this sacrament of faith Jesus becomes part of us. His self-giving act of love becomes our real, nourishing, and transforming food.

For John, those who do not eat and drink the signs of Jesus’ self-giving love are not in relationship with him. They do not abide in him nor he in them.

Jesus made bread broken the sign of giving his life of the world. To share the Body of Christ in the Eucharist is to commit to give one’s self for the life of the world as Jesus did. In making a cup of wine the pledge of pouring out his lifeblood for us, Jesus makes the sign our means of pledging commitment and faith. To eat this bread and drink this wine makes faith in Jesus our sustenance. It takes the whole Christian community to remember Jesus’ gift of himself and to make him present today. We are the Body of Christ.

How has participating in Eucharist nourished and transformed you?

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Gospel Reflection for May 29, 2016, Blood and Body of Christ

25 May
Photo via Flickr user khrawlings

Photo via Flickr user khrawlings

Sunday Readings: Genesis 14.18-20; 1 Corinthians 11.23-26; Luke 9.11-17

“Why don’t you give them something to eat yourselves?”

(Luke 9.13)

When shared the food Jesus gives multiplies, just as love and forgiveness do. Jesus’ teaching nourishes. We hear and make his word our own in living it. We become what we eat in sharing the bread that becomes the body of Christ at Eucharist. The body and the self-giving love it signifies multiply. Both hearing Jesus’ teaching and sharing bread involve communion, an intimate sharing in which love and commitment multiply.

At the beginning of Sunday’s gospel Jesus urges his disciples to give the crowd something to eat. This is our call today – to hand on what we become in the Eucharist – nourishment in abundance for all.

How does celebrating Eucharist nourish you? How does Eucharist lead you to nourish others?

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Gospel Reflection for January 17, 2016, 2nd Sunday Ordinary Time

12 Jan
Photo via Flickr user Lawrence OP

Photo via Flickr user Lawrence OP

Sunday Readings: Isaiah 62.1-5; 1 Corinthians 12.4-11; John 2.1-11

“His mother said to the servants, ‘Do whatever Jesus tells you.’ Now standing there were six stone water jars for the Jewish rites of purification, each holding 20 or 30 gallons. Jesus said to them, ‘Fill the jars with water.'”

(John 2.5-7)

The wedding setting in the gospel hints at a marriage other than the one the guests are celebrating. His mother and newly-recruited disciples accompany Jesus to the wedding. Turning six 20-gallon jars of water into choice wine provides 120 gallons for a wedding feast that must be nearly over if the guests have drunk up the available wine. The abundant wine Jesus provides is not just for the wedding guests in Cana but for the community that continues to gather in his name at every Eucharist.

How do you live the words of Jesus’ mother, “Do whatever he tells you?”

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Gospel Reflection for October 18, 2015, 29th Sunday Ordinary Time

13 Oct

Sunday Readings: Isaiah 53.10-11; Hebrews 3.14-16; Mark 10.35-45

“Can you drink the cup that I drink?”

(Mark 10.38)

“We can,” James and John respond to Jesus’ question in Sunday’s gospel.  The irony of their brash response is that they do the opposite.  They forsake Jesus when he gets arrested and flee with all of Jesus’ men disciples except Peter, who denies knowing Jesus in the high priest’s courtyard.  When following becomes life-threatening, neither James or John nor the others stay the course.  Their commitment evaporates.  They shrink from drinking the cup of suffering Jesus is about to drink.  The gospel writer Mark wants us to recognize Jesus’ first disciples had to grow into their commitment as we can.

At every eucharist we drink the cup that Jesus drank.  We brashly say amen, agreeing this is the lifeblood of Christ poured out for us.  It becomes part of us, a commitment to live into each day.

To what do you commit when at Mass you drink the cup that Jesus drank?

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Gospel Reflection for August 23, 2015, 21st Sunday Ordinary Time

19 Aug

Sunday Readings: Joshua 24.2-3, 15-17, 18; Ephesians 5.21-32; John 6.60-69

“Many of his disciples were listening to Jesus’ teaching.  They said, ‘This teaching is difficult.  How can anyone take it seriously'”?

(John 6.60)

Jesus’ disciples face a choice.  Will they stay with him or drift off with the crowds?  The long reflection on Jesus as the bread of life becomes increasingly challenging to believe, especially the way John’s gospel pushes the literalness of the image.  “Those who eat my flesh and drink my blood have eternal life.”  This is part of last Sunday’s gospel.  This is the difficult teaching.  Their reaction invites us into the dizzying experience of realizing that like them, we have taken Jesus’ words too literally rather than sacramentally.  In John’s gospel Jesus often makes statements that hearers misunderstand and that call us to reflect on his teaching.  The bread and wine the priest consecrates at Mass signifies Jesus’ gift of his life and love on the cross.

How do you understand the mystery of the Eucharist?

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Gospel Reflection for August 16, 2015, 20th Sunday Ordinary Time

14 Aug

Sunday Readings: Proverbs 9.6-1; Ephesians 5.15-20; John 6.51-58

“The one who eats this bread will live forever.”

(John 6.58)

What kind of food do you crave? Chocolate? Popcorn? Anything salty, greasy, fried? What if there is a good that we can have a real relationship with? What if it’s a food we can not only desire but a food that craves us? What if there is a food that we can actually love and that can love us back? This can be said of Eucharist.

Eucharist can be absolutely harmless, even boring perhaps, or it can shake us and the world with its explosive force. What if there is no such thing as Eucharist that is thoroughly private? What if Eucharist either draws me into a relationship with every other Christian or it’s phony? What if, just like all interpersonal relationships, the right kind of chemistry can release astonishing power when together we are fed living food?

How does joining in Eucharist give you life?

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Gospel Reflection for August 2, 2015, 18th Sunday Ordinary Time

29 Jul
Photo via Flickr user Jonathan Assink

Photo via Flickr user Jonathan Assink

Sunday Readings: Exodus 16.2-4, 12-15; Ephesians 4.17, 20-24; John 6.24-35

“I am the bread of life. Whoever comes to me will never be hungry, and whoever believes in me will never be thirsty.”

(John 6.35)

When Jesus sits at table with his friends, he has little more to say to them than what he has been trying to say through the whole witness of his life: “Here I am, like this bread and this cup — take it, let me be broken and poured out for you, so that the kingdom may come.” Jesus is not about being the strongest or most intimidating guy in the room or coercing and threatening people into believing the way he wants. Eucharist celebrates the one who chose to put himself on the line as a person for others.

Who in your life is a person for others?

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